Steampunk Sci-Fi Main

The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen

20,000 Leagues Under the Sea

More Steampunk Sci-Fi



As our referenced quote states in SFMZ's Sci-Fi Sub-genres A to Z feature, Steampunk Sci-Fi refers to an advanced technological level achieved through 19th century means. It denotes works set in an era when steam power was still widely used. Usually set in the 19th century, and often set in Victorian England — though with otherwise high technology or other science fiction elements. These elements may be fictional advances, like those devised by H.G. Wells, or they may be real advances taken out of their own time.



20,000 Leagues Under the Sea - 1954


Back to the Future III - 1990


Wild Wild West - 1999


The Time Machine - 2002



The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen - 2003

In possession of highly superior weapons, the Fantom is trying to start a World War. He tricks the countries into suspecting each other for war-mongering. In a private meeting, Allan Quatermain meets who he is to be teaming up with to track down the group who is trying to start the war.

He is accompanied by Captain Nemo, Mina Harker, Rodney Skinner, Dorian Gray, Tom Sawyer, and Dr. Jekyll (also Mr. Hyde). Soon into their adventure they discover that the Fantom is behind these attacks, but there is more to this war than battle and cunning.





BRIEF HIGHLIGHTS ON OTHER STEAMPUNK SCI-FI


Time After Time 1979

It's 1893 London. Futurist H.G. Wells believes that the future holds a Utopian society. He also believes in time travel. He has just built a time machine which he is displaying to a group of skeptical friends, including surgeon Dr. John Leslie Stevenson. Unbeknown to Wells or anyone else among that circle, Stevenson is better known to the public as Jack the Ripper. Just as the police are about to capture Stevenson, he uses the time machine to escape, with Wells being the only one who knows what happened to him.

Not telling anyone except his trusting housekeeper, Wells follows Stevenson in order to capture and bring him back to face justice. Where Stevenson has gone is 1979 San Francisco. There, Wells is dismayed to find that the future is not Utopia as he had predicted. But Wells is also picked up by a young woman named Amy Robbins. As Wells and Amy search for Stevenson, Stevenson conversely is after Wells to obtain the master key to the time machine. As Stevenson continues his murderous ways, he will stop at nothing to achieve his desires, which places Amy in danger.



Q.E.D. 1982

Q.E.D. is a short-lived adventure series set in Edwardian England, starring Sam Waterston as Professor Quentin Everett Deverill. The Professor was a scientific detective in the mold of Sherlock Holmes, and the series had a smattering of what would later be called steampunk. In the show, the lead character was known primarily by his initials, Q.E.D; the reference here is that Q.E.D. usually stands for quod erat demonstrandum, a statement signalling the end of a proof. The show aired on the CBS network in the United States, and on Channel 4 in the United Kingdom.



Steamboy 2004

Steamboy is a Japanese epic steampunk animated action film produced by Sunrise, directed and co-written by Katsuhiro Otomo, his second major anime release, following Akira. The film was released in Japan on July 17, 2004. Steamboy is one of the most expensive Japanese animated movies made to date. Additionally, the film was in production for ten years and utilized more than 180,000 drawings and 440 CG cuts. It's based in 1860s England and is entirely set in a steampunk environment.

The plot revolves around a boy, his grandfather and father and an exciting but dangerous advancement in steam power. It is cited as one of the most expensive Japanese animated movies made to date. The film was not a box office success in the United States. According to an IGN.com reviewer, this could be due to the marketing methods used in the U. S. Steamboy could have had a larger Western audience, but due to the limited release, that was not able to happen.



Howl's Moving Castle 2004

The 2004 film Howl's Moving Castle has steam-powered busses, dirigibles & other flying machines. The film is a 2004 Japanese animated film scripted and directed by Hayao Miyazaki. The film is based on the novel of the same name by English writer Diana Wynne Jones. The story centers on a love story between an 18-year-old girl named Sofî, cursed by a witch into an old woman's body, and a magician named Hauru. Under the curse, Sofî sets out to seek her fortune, which takes her to Hauru's strange moving castle.

In the castle, Sophie meets Hauru's fire demon, named Karishifâ. Seeing that she is under a curse, the demon makes a deal with Sophie--if she breaks the contract he is under with Hauru, then Karushifâ will lift the curse that Sophie is under, and she will return to her 18-year-old shape.



Tin Man 2007

The Syfy miniseries Tin Man incorporates a considerable amount of steampunk-inspired themes into a re-imagining of L. Frank Baum's The Wonderful Wizard of Oz. Tin Man, starring Zooey Deschanel, Neal McDonough, Alan Cumming, Raoul Trujillo, Kathleen Robertson, and Richard Dreyfuss, is a continuation of the classic story with science fiction and additional fantasy elements added. It focuses on the adventures of a small-town waitress named DG who is pulled into a magical realm called the O.Z., ruled by the tyrannical sorceress Azkadellia.

Together with her companions Glitch, Raw, and Cain, DG journeys to uncover her lost memories, find her true parents, and foil Azkadellia's plot to trap the O.Z. in eternal darkness. It was nominated for nine Emmy awards, winning one, and was also nominated for a Critics' Choice Award. Critics gave it mixed reviews, with some praising the acting, soundtrack, and visual effects, while others found it overly grim and bleak.




Warehouse 13 - 2009

The Syfy series Warehouse 13 features many steampunk-inspired objects and artifacts, including computer designs created by steampunk artisan Richard Nagy, aka "Datamancer". The series follows U.S. Secret Service Agents Myka Bering (Joanne Kelly) and Pete Lattimer (Eddie McClintock) when they are assigned to the secretive Warehouse 13 for supernatural artifacts. It is located in a barren landscape in South Dakota, and they initially regard the assignment as punishment.

As they go about their assignments to retrieve missing artifacts and investigate reports of new ones, they come to understand the importance of what they are doing. In Season 1, Episode 4, they meet Claudia Donovan (Allison Scagliotti), who is searching for her missing brother; in Season 2, she joins the team as their technology expert. In Season 3, Episode 1, Steve Jinks (Aaron Ashmore), an Agent from Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives comes aboard.


The series posits that there have been a dozen incarnations of the Warehouse before the present-day 13th in South Dakota. Warehouse 1 was built between 336–323 BC under Alexander the Great as a place to keep artifacts obtained by war. After Alexander died, the Warehouse was moved to Egypt, establishing the practice of locating the Warehouse in the most powerful empire of the day, under the reasoning that it will there be best defended.

Egypt's Ptolemaic rulers appointed a group of people, known as the Regents, to oversee the Warehouse and act as its first "agents" and collectors of artifacts. Warehouse 2 lasted until the Roman conquest of Egypt. Other warehouses: Warehouse 3 in Western Roman Empire (Italy), Warehouse 4 in Hunnic Empire until the death of Attilla the Hun, Warehouse 5 in Byzantine Empire, Warehouse 6 in Cambodia under Khmer Empire, Warehouse 7 in the Mongol Empire under Genghis Khan.


Also, Warehouse 8 in Germany during the Holy Roman Empire (1260–1517), Warehouse 9 in the Ottoman capital of Constantinople (now called Istanbul) (the inspiration for Ali Baba) until the death of Suleiman the Magnificent, Warehouse 10 in Mughal Empire (India), Warehouse 11 in the Russian Empire under the Romanov Dynasty (the 1812 Napoleonic War with Russia was an attempt to seize control of Warehouse 11), and Warehouse 12 in the United Kingdom from 1830 until 1914.


It was during the time of Warehouse 11 that the Regents began to employ agents to gather and protect artifacts. This practice continued under Warehouse 12, with British agents traveling further and further searching for artifacts to add to the collection. The next move brought the Warehouse to South Dakota in the United States. Unlike previous warehouses, which were placed in the centers of their empires, Warehouse 13 was located in a remote area of South Dakota to hide it.

The first Warehouse 13 was built in 1898, but the structure burned down because of an insufficient understanding of how to safely store artifacts. The move to the rebuilt and current Warehouse 13 occurred in 1914 at the onset of World War I. The Warehouse was designed by Thomas Edison, Nikola Tesla, and M. C. Escher, while the Warehouse Expansion Joints were created by Albert Einstein.




Resource Credits: Wikipedia.org, imdb.com



Steampunk Sci-Fi Main

The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen

20,000 Leagues Under the Sea

More Steampunk Sci-Fi



Site design by SFMZone. Copyright 2010 All Rights Reserved. Viewing Requirements: 1280 resolution or above. | TOP^