TNG CAST: SERIES REGULARS


Jean-Luc Picard

Patrick Stewart as Captain Jean-Luc Picard, commanding officer of the USS Enterprise.


William Riker

Jonathan Frakes as Commander William Riker, the ship's first officer. The Riker character was influenced by concepts for first officer Willard Decker in the Star Trek: Phase II television series. Decker's romantic history with helmsman Ilia was mirrored in The Next Generation in the relationship between Riker and Deanna Troi.

Riker also appears in an episode each of Star Trek: Voyager and Star Trek: Enterprise. In addition to William Riker, Frakes played William's transporter-created double, Thomas, in one episode each of The Next Generation and Star Trek: Deep Space Nine.


Data

Brent Spiner as Lieutenant Commander Data, an android who serves as operations officer and third-in-command. Data's "outsider's" perspective on humanity served a similar narrative purpose as Spock's in the original Star Trek. Spiner also played his "brother", Lore, and his creator, Noonien Soong. In Enterprise, Spiner played Noonien's ancestor, Arik.


Geordi La Forge

LeVar Burton as Geordi La Forge. La Forge is initially the ship's helmsman, and the character becomes chief engineer beginning in the second season. Burton also played the character in an episode of Voyager.


Worf

Michael Dorn as Worf, a Klingon. Worf initially appears as a junior officer fulfilling several roles on the bridge. When Denise Crosby left at the end of the first season, the Worf character succeeded Lieutenant Yar as the ship's chief of security and tactical officer. Michael Dorn reprised the character for four seasons of Deep Space Nine.


Deanna Troi

Marina Sirtis as the half-human, half-Betazoid ship's counselor, Deanna Troi. The character's relationship with first officer Riker was a carry-over from character ideas developed for Phase II. Troi also appears in later episodes of Voyager and in the finale of Enterprise.


Beverly Crusher

Gates McFadden as Doctor Beverly Crusher, the Enterprise's chief medical officer. McFadden left the series during the second season to pursue film roles, but she returned in the third season and remained for the remainder of the series.


Tasha Yar

Denise Crosby as Tasha Yar, chief of security and tactical officer. Crosby left the series at the end of the first season, and the Yar character was killed. Yar returns in alternate timelines in the award-winning episode "Yesterday's Enterprise" and the series finale, "All Good Things...". Crosby also played Sela, Yar's half-Romulan daughter.



TNG CAST: RECURRING CHARACTERS



Q

John de Lancie as Q, an omnipotent antagonist from the Q Continuum. de Lancie continued playing the Q character in both Deep Space Nine and Voyager.


Guinan

Whoopi Goldberg as Guinan, the El-Aurian bartender in the ship's lounge, Ten Forward.


Miles O'Brien

Colm Meaney as Miles O'Brien. O'Brien is an unnamed helmsman in the show's pilot, and appears several times in other positions during the first season. The character eventually was developed into the transporter chief. Meaney portrayed O'Brien for seven seasons as a series regular on Deep Space Nine.


Reginald Barclay

Dwight Schultz as Reginald Barclay, a technician and engineer who also plays a prominent role in the later seasons of Voyager.





Star Trek: The Next Generation, created by Gene Roddenberry, is set in the nearby regions of the Milky Way galaxy, approximately during the 2360s (about 100 years after the original series) and features a new crew and a new starship Enterprise. Roddenberry, Rick Berman, and Michael Piller served as executive producers at different times throughout the production. The show was created 21 years after the original Star Trek show.

Patrick Stewart's voice-over introduction during each episode's opening credits stated the starship's purpose, updated from the original to represent an open-ended "mission", and to be gender-neutral: Space: the final frontier. These are the voyages of the starship Enterprise. Its continuing mission: to explore strange new worlds, to seek out new life and new civilizations, to boldly go where no one has gone before.



By 1986, 20 years after its debut on NBC, Star Trek had become the "crown jewel" of Paramount Pictures, a "priceless asset" whose longevity amazed studio executives. The show was the most popular syndicated television program 17 years after cancelation, and the Harve Bennett-produced Star Trek films did well at the box office.

William Shatner's and Leonard Nimoy's demands for "sky-high salaries" for Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home (1986) caused the studio to plan for a new Star Trek television series, as it had hoped to do so in 1977 with Star Trek: Phase II before making the films. Paramount executives worried that a new show could hurt the demand for the films, but decided that one with unknown actors would be more profitable than paying the films' actors millions.



Roddenberry initially declined to be involved but came on board as creator after being unhappy with early conceptual work. Star Trek: The Next Generation was announced on October 10, 1986, and its cast in May 1987. Paramount executive Rick Berman was assigned to the show at Roddenberry's request. Roddenberry hired a number of Star Trek veterans, including Bob Justman, D. C. Fontana, Eddie Milkis, and David Gerrold.

Early proposals for the series included one in which some of the original series's cast might appear as "elder statesmen", and Roddenberry speculated as late as October 1986 that the new show might not even use a spaceship, as "people might travel by some [other] means" 100 years after the USS Enterprise (NCC-1701). A more lasting change was his new belief that workplace interpersonal conflict would no longer exist in the future; thus, the new show did not have parallels to the frequent "crusty banter" between Kirk, Spock, and Leonard McCoy.



According to series actor Patrick Stewart, Berman was more receptive than Roddenberry to the show addressing political issues. The show's music theme combined the fanfare from the original series theme by Alexander Courage with Jerry Goldsmith's theme for Star Trek: The Motion Picture (1979). Some early episodes' plots derived from outlines created for Star Trek: Phase II.

Additionally, some sets used in the Original Series-era films were redressed for The Next Generation, and in turn used for subsequent Original Series films. Part of the transporter room set in The Next Generation was used in the original Star Trek's transporter set. Many production details, such as LCARS computer interfaces and starship design, were carried through in the production of subsequent spin-offs.



It premiered the week of September 28, 1987, to 27 million viewers with the two-hour pilot "Encounter at Farpoint". With 178 episodes spread over seven seasons, it ran longer than any other Star Trek series, ending with the two-hour finale "All Good Things..." the week of May 23, 1994. The series was broadcast in first-run syndication with dates and times varying among individual television stations. The show gained a considerable following during its run and, like the original series, remains popular in syndicated reruns.

Three additional Star Trek spin-offs followed The Next Generation: Star Trek: Deep Space Nine (1993–1999), Star Trek: Voyager (1995–2001), and Star Trek: Enterprise (2001–2005). The series formed the basis of the seventh to tenth Star Trek films, and is also the setting of numerous novels, comic books, and games.

In its seventh season, Star Trek: The Next Generation became the first and only syndicated television show to be nominated for the Emmy Award for Best Dramatic Series. The show received numerous recognitions, including Emmy Awards, Hugo Awards, and a Peabody Award. The Next Generation made several publications' lists of the best television shows of all time.



Star Trek: The Next Generation follows the adventures of a space-faring crew on board the starship USS Enterprise (NCC-1701-D), the fifth Federation vessel to bear the name and registry and the seventh starship by that name. The show is set roughly 80 years after the final missions of the original Enterprise crew under the command of James T. Kirk. The Federation has undergone massive internal changes in its quest to explore and seek out new life, adding new degrees of complexity and controversy to its methods, especially those focused on the Prime Directive.



The Klingon Empire and the United Federation of Planets have ceased wartime hostilities and become galactic allies, while more sinister foes like the Romulans and the Borg take precedence on the show. The Enterprise is commanded by Captain Jean-Luc Picard and is staffed by first officer Commander William Riker, the android Lieutenant Commander Data, security chief Lieutenant Tasha Yar, ship's counselor Deanna Troi, Klingon tactical officer Lieutenant Worf, Doctor Beverly Crusher, and conn officer Lieutenant Geordi La Forge.



The death of Lieutenant Yar in the show's first season prompts an internal shuffle of personnel, making Worf official chief of security. Geordi La Forge is promoted to chief engineer at the beginning of season 2. The show begins with the crew of the Enterprise-D put on trial by a nefarious, omnipotent being known as Q. The godlike entity threatens the extinction of mankind for being a race of savages, forcing them to solve a mystery at nearby Farpoint Station in order to prove their worthiness of being spared.



After successfully solving the mystery and avoiding disaster, the crew officially departs on its mission to explore strange new worlds. Subsequent stories focus on the discovery of new life and sociological and political relationships with alien cultures, as well as exploring the human condition. Several new species are introduced as recurring antagonists, including the Ferengi, the Cardassians, and the Borg.



Throughout their adventures, Picard and his crew are often forced to face difficult choices and live with the consequences of those choices. The show ended in its seventh season with a two-part episode "All Good Things...", which brought the events of the series full circle back to the original confrontation with Q. An interstellar anomaly that threatens all life in the universe forces Captain Picard to leap from his present, past and future to combat the threat.



Picard was successfully able to demonstrate to Q that humanity could think outside of the confines of perception and theorize on new possibilities while still being prepared to sacrifice themselves for the sake of the greater good. The show ended with the crew of the Enterprise portrayed as feeling more like a family and paved the way for four consecutive motion pictures that continued the theme and mission of the series.



IMAGE GALLERY


Previous Image

Next Image






Site design by SFMZone. Copyright 2010 All Rights Reserved. Viewing Requirements: 1280 resolution or above. | TOP^