SCI-FI SUBGENRES A - B

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NEAR-FUTURE SCI-FI
Takes place in the present day or in the next few decades


Elements of the Near-future science fiction setting should be familiar to the reader, and the technology may be current or in development. Stories about nanotechnology or genetics, such as Greg Bear's Blood Music, often fall into this category.


NEW WAVE SCI-FI
Characterised by a high degree of experimentation, both in form and in content


New Wave SF was a movement and a literary style, beginning in England and spreading to the USA and beyond. Michael Moorcock launched the trend in 1964, and Harlan Ellison's two "Dangerous Visions" anthologies are now viewed as its high point.

This subgenre rose and fell with western society's embrace of 1960s radicalism, and desire to 'shock the bourgeoisie.' (Echoes of the movement have affected SF, and literature in general, ever since.)



References and Excerpts:
cuebon.com, editorialdepartment.com,
fictionfactor.com, techrepublic.com,
wikipedia.org, worldswithoutend.com,
writing-world.com, imdb.com






SCI-FI SUBGENRES N - O



NANOTECH SCI-FI

Nanotechnology is the design, characterization, production and application of structures, devices and systems by controlling shape and size on the nanoscale. Nanotechnology has been put to practical use for a wide range of applications, including stain resistant pants, enhanced tire reinforcement and improved suntan lotion.

Another description of this subgenre is Nanopunk, which has been regarded as one of cyberpunk's many offshoots. It explores the effects of advanced nanotechnology on humanity. Linda Nagata's novel Tech Heaven is the principal example, while Michael Crichton's novel Prey introduced the concept to the mainstream.

The 1963 and 1995 television series The Outer Limits not only contained episodes as examples of this subgenre, but the series could fill the bill for many of the subgenres featured in this article. One such episode is The New Breed, which is a fine example of Nanotech Sci-Fi.

In this episode, Dr. Stephen Ledbetter makes a technological and medical breakthrough when he creates a type of tiny machine, known as nanobots, capable of curing any disease or imperfections in the human body.



OCCUPATIONAL SCI-FI

This subgenre encompasses a wide reach, and yet remains unusual. It features blue collar protagonists, on Earth or in recognizable circumstances, rather than hifalutin scientists or astronauts. The hero of John DeChancie's novel Starrigger is a truck driver. Piers Anthony's novel Hard Sell realistically depicts several workaday occupations. Most other examples are short stories.

In cinema, the 2010 feature film Repo Men centers around two repo collector's set in the near future. Rather than repossessing cars, the blue collar hunters go after clients who failed to pay for their organ replacements.



OTHER WORLDS SCI-FI

Totally fictional worlds/universes feature in these stories. Frank Herbert's classic "Dune" featured perhaps the most popular 'other world' in science fiction history.

Dune was adapted to feature film with David Lynch's 1984 box office dud and Syfy's pair of miniseries including Children of Dune.

Anne McCaffrey also created a hugely popular fictional world, "Pern", populated by telepathic dragons.



SCI-FI SUB-GENRES - P - Q > > >




SCI-FI SUBGENRES A - B

- C -

- D -

- E -

- F -

- G -

H - J

K - M

N - O

P - Q

- R -

- S -

- T -

U - Z



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