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HOLLOW EARTH SCI-FI
A subgenre of science fiction that involves gothic conventions


Hollow Earth tales are just that, set within a putatively hollow (or at least honeycombed) planet Earth. The flagship of this subgenre is Jules Verne's novel Journey to the Center of the Earth, which was adapted to a number of film and television version including the 2009 3D version starring Brendan Fraser.

Michael Flynn's novella "Where the Winds Are All Asleep" is a modern homage. A popular variant is the aquatic-cavern-filled planet Naboo in the "Star Wars" franchise.



HUMOROUS SCI-FI
Sci-fi is more or less just a premise to the prime directive of comedy


Light/humorous science fiction may occur within any of these subgenres, or (often) spoof a subgenre. As with comic fantasy, the type of humor varies from light entertainment to satire.

This laugh-out-loud subgenre includes John Sladek's novel Mechasm, Rudy Rucker's novel Master of Space and Time, and many others.

Douglas Adams' Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy (also a television series and feature film) is one of the best-known examples of humorous science fiction. Other humorous sci-fi films include Spaceballs, Tim Allen's Galaxy Quest, Back to the Future, and more.




References and Excerpts:
cuebon.com
editorialdepartment.com
fictionfactor.com
techrepublic.com
wikipedia.org
worldswithoutend.com
writing-world.com






SCI-FI SUBGENRES - H - J



HARD SCI-FI
A particular emphasis on scientific detail
and / or accuracy


Stories based on real science & engineering for the most part, it is driven more by ideas than characterization. Near realistic science and technology are central to the plot. Stories in this broad subgenre depict technology that conforms to actual scientific knowledge and physical laws, or extentions of them that scientists consider plausible.

If a story is set on a lunar colony, for example, issues of technology may be of greater concern than a character's personal life. It usually has a good grasp of the scientific principles involved.

The real test of whether a story is 'hard' sci-fi or not is this: remove the technological factor or the science from the plotline. If the plot cannot maintain its integrity without it, then the story is 'hard' sci-fi. If the story remains intact, then it is more likely soft sci-fi.

Stories typically contain the inclusion of at least one of the "Hard Sciences" such as Astronomy, Physics, and Chemistry, sciences ruled by mathematics and stringent rules. Other features may include attention to scientific detail and use of current scientific research. Arguably, certain exceptions include favored 'tropes' such as antigravity and FTL travel.

There is a great deal of disagreement among readers and writers over what exactly constitutes an interest in scientific detail. Many hard SF stories focus on the natural sciences and technological developments, but many others leave technology in the background. Others contend that if the technology is left in the background it is an example of soft science fiction. Another distinction within the genre revolves around portrayals of the human condition.

Some authors seek to reflect technical accuracy within an advanced, nearly utopian society in which mankind has attained victory over most human ills; others seek to portray the impact of technology on the human race with human defects still firmly in place and sometimes even magnified. Much classic science fiction, including the earlier works of A.C. Clarke, Isaac Asimov, Greg Bear, Larry Niven, and Heinlein, fall into this category. Stanley Kubrick's sci-fi cult classic film 2001: A Space Odyssey adapted from Clarke's The Sentinel, makes an extensive effort to keep the technology as realistic as possible with the exception of the mysterious Black Monolith.



HORRIFIC SCI-FI

Horror and and science fiction seem to go hand in hand. Horrific SF is closely linked to the 'horror' genre, and while it's often bloody, science is crucial to each premise. In Sharman DiVono's novel Blood Moon, an entire lunar base goes slowly insane. Most examples of this subgenre are short stories, such as Michael Shea's "The Autopsy," Simon Ings's "The Wedding Party," and Terry Bisson's "Necronauts."

Horrific sci-fi in cinema is quite popular with examples too many to mention, but to name a few, there's Species, The Thing, Resident Evil, The Fly, Scanners, The Blob, Lifeforce, Event Horizon, and many, many more. Very few films fit this category as well as Ridley Scott's Alien. This film often appears in both Top Sci-fi and Top Horror Best of Lists.



HYPERSPACE SCI-FI

Hyperspace stories include that extra-dimensional realm as a setting. The pioneering classic of this subgenre is Edward Abbot's 1884 novel Flatland, a Romance of Many Dimensions, although our familiar third spatial axis is the "extra" one. (In a later sequel, Sphereland, by Dionys Burger, a talking hypersphere arrives.)

That realm might play a major role in allowing the characters to travel rapidly between star systems (and/or time periods, etc.), or there might be human dwellings and/or aliens within that arcane realm.

A good example is Star Trek: Deep Space Nine, with its mysterious wormhole-dwelling 'prophet' aliens.



SCI-FI SUB-GENRES - K - M > > >




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