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FANTASY SCI-FI
A mixed genre of story which contains some science fiction and some fantasy elements


This sub-genre is a merging of the two main genres, sometimes leaning toward the sci-fi side of the fence adding advanced technology in the mix.

Not so much explored today, but a regular staple in the 1930's and 1940's. With fairy tale like sub-plots and characters, it would often ignore known laws or scientific theories for the sake of the story. Arthur C. Clarke once said, "any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic."

Flash Gordon, Buster Crabbe's matinee serials of the 30's, stomped all over the laws of physics in telling their fantastical tales containing giant lizard like dragons, shark men, and other bizarre characters and creatures. Literature examples could include Anne McCaffrey's "Pern" novels and Edgar Rice Burroughs' Barsoom novels.




References and Excerpts:
cuebon.com
editorialdepartment.com
fictionfactor.com
techrepublic.com
wikipedia.org
worldswithoutend.com
writing-world.com






SCI-FI SUBGENRES - F



FIRM SCIENCE SCI-FI

Firm Science is a specific definition, which can be applied to many subgenres. It refers to a midway point between 'hard' and 'soft' SF, and the inclusion of technology and /or phenomena that are not too fantastic, but may never be invented.

This subgenre could also include characters who are grounded in the real world along with their environment, but a unique element of enhanced physical capabilities or elevated powers of the mind exist.

One feature film that may reside within this category could be Christopher Nolan's Inception, where the story's world mirrors the real world for the most part with the exception that the main character has the ability to probe other's dreams.



FIRST LANDINGS SCI-FI

Originally this meant a journey to the Moon, the only 'obvious' world beyond ours. Jules Verne's novel From the Earth to the Moon, also a Golden Globe and Emmy award winning television miniseries, is not the earliest example (that honor goes to Lucian of Samosata, an ancient Roman author), but it's the best known.

There are numerous 'first to Mars' novels, such as Robert Zubrin's First Landing and other similar stories involving most of the known planets and nearby star systems. After the short-lived Apollo program, this subgenre began to depict a hoped-for return to the moon. (In many cases, by determined private entrepreneurs who outrun a moribund NASA.)



FRONTIER SCI-FI
Stories of people conquering new frontiers, leaving our world to colonize a preferable one


Usually told with a "Grass is greener" aspect, only to learn that the same problems face them in the new colony.

Similar to hardscrabble miners, crafty independent spacemen ply the asteroid belt in search of resources to send back to civilization.

A good example is Peter Hyam's film Outland, which is an homage to High Noon. There are hundreds of examples in print Alfred Bester's novel The Stars My Destination.

In many of such stories they're threatened by an aggressive government or big corpration from Earth.

New or cut-off colony planets, left to support themselves, have a distinct frontier aspect. Joss Whedon's popular "Firefly/Serenity" franchise depicts such rough colonies.



SCI-FI SUB-GENRES - G > > >




SCI-FI SUBGENRES A - B

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H - J

K - M

N - O

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U - Z



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