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DETECTIVE SCI-FI
Robotic police, telepathic investigation, etc.


In these stories, often set in the near future, technology aids both criminals and law enforcement. Various short stories introduced robotic police. This was popularized by the eponymous (actually cyborg) character in Paul Verhoeven's film Robocop.

Alfred Bester's novel The Demolished Man depicts a deadly cat-and-mouse game between psychic police and criminals.




References and Excerpts:
cuebon.com
editorialdepartment.com
fictionfactor.com
techrepublic.com
wikipedia.org
worldswithoutend.com
writing-world.com






SCI-FI SUBGENRES - D



DYING EARTH SCI-FI
The demise of our planet, faced with the prospect that it can no longer support life


Dying Earth tales show the death of the Earth as slower than from an apocalypse, and it can be due to any cause, including natural. More generally, this sub-genre encompasses science fiction works set in the far distant future in a milieu of stasis or decline. Themes of world-weariness, innocence (wounded or otherwise), idealism, entropy and the hope of renewal tend to pre-dominate.

A haunting vision of this appears in the far-future chapters of H.G. Well's novel The Time Machine. (Including a 'lost' chapter about a biologically decrepit humanity, originally serialized but not included in the novel and film versions.) Isaac Asimov's novel Pebble in the Sky is another example. In cinema, the feature film WALL-E portrays a dying Earth from an ocean of refuse created by humankind. The lone entity of life on Earth is a tiny plant sprout (and a cute cockroach), which is the catalyst of the plot.



DYSTOPIAN SCI-FI
Glimpses into the possibility of really bad futures - crowded world, gilded cage, jaded society, theocracy, etc.


Dystopian fiction is the opposite of Utopian: creation of a nightmare world, sometimes also described as "the victory of forces of reason over forces of kindness". These tales are designed to make the reader ask the bleak question "Is life worth living if this is where humanity is going?".

The anime series (and feature film) Aeon Flux was set in a bizarre dystopian world and the title character was a tall, latex-clad secret agent from the nation of Monica, skilled in assassination and acrobatics. Another example is the spaceship Axiom in Disney/Pixar's movie Wall-E.

Often this subgenre depicts inquisitive heroes breaking free of a bottled utopia, such as the sealed city in Douglas R. Mason's novel Eight Against Utopia. In most such tales, the protagonist seeks to better his-or-her own life, if not to liberate the entire society.

Aldous Huxley's "Brave New World" (1932) is a tale of classic dystopia with an emphasis on brainwashing, censorship and destruction of the family unit. George Orwell's "1984" coined the term "Big Brother" in his bleak, dystopian view of a future gone mad. Cyril Kornbluth's novel The Marching Morons depicts a cityscape jammed with idiotic yet pampered workers. A.E. Van Vogt's novel The Empire of Isher portrays a decadent and sybaritic world-ruling class. Robert Heinlein's Revolt in 2100 is a novel that depict a puritanical religious ruling class.



SCI-FI SUB-GENRES - E > > >




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