1990 - Total Recall

7.3 / 6.6 57 7.5 X1 7.46

Total Recall debuted at No.1 at the box office. The film grossed $261,299,840 worldwide, a box office success. Critical reaction to Total Recall has been mostly positive. Roger Ebert awarded the film three and a half stars (out of four), calling it "one of the most complex and visually interesting science fiction movies in a long time." Entertainment Weekly praised the film, giving it a score of "B+" and said that it "starts out as mind-bending futuristic satire and then turns relentless [and] becomes a violent, post-punk version of an Indiana Jones cliff-hanger."

Film scholar William Buckland considers it one of the more "sublime" Philip K. Dick adaptations, contrasting it with films like Impostor and Paycheck, which he considered "ridiculous." The San Francisco Chronicle said the film is not a classic, "but it's still solid and entertaining." James Berardinelli gave the film two and a half stars (out of four), saying that "neither Schwarzenegger nor Verhoeven have stretched their talents here," but added, "with a script that's occasionally as smart as it is energetic, Total Recall offers a little more than wholesale carnage."

Total Recall received numerous nominations along with three award wins. The film won an Oscar for Best Visual Effects along with Oscar nominations for Best Sound Mixing and Best Sound Editing. The Saturn Awards honored it with Best Science Fiction Film and Best Costume Awards along with Saturn nominations for Best Special Effects, Best Writing, Best Make-up, Best Music, Best Direction, Best Actor, and Best Supporting Actress. It was also nominated Outstanding Foreign Language Film by the Japan Academy, BAFTA nominated for Best Special Visual Effects, and Hugo nominated for Best Dramatic Presentation. The film ranked #79 on Rotten Tomatoes’ Journey Through Sci-Fi (100 Best-Reviewed Sci-Fi Movies). In 2008, Total Recall was nominated for AFI's Top 10 Science Fiction Films list.


Other sci-fi films of 1990: A trilogy came to an end with Back to the Future Part III, earning a 7.09 SFMZ final score. The film won a Saturn Award for Best Music and Best Supporting Actor, along with Saturn nominations for Best Science Fiction Film, Best Costumes, Best Director, and Best Supporting Actress. It was also Hugo nominated for Best Dramatic Presentation.

Also released was Tremors (6.53 SFMZ final score), which was Saturn nominated for Best Science Fiction Film, Best Special Effects, and Best Supporting Actress. Although Tremors was not a big hit during its theatrical run, the film became a runaway smash in the home video market, and ultimately tripled its original box office gross with VHS sales and rentals.





1991 - Terminator 2: Judgment Day

8.4 / 7.4 68 8.6 X4 8.94

Terminator 2: Judgment Day has a long list of award wins and nominations, winning four Oscars including Best Make Up, Best Sound, Best Sound Editing, and Best Visual Effects, along with Oscar nominations for Best Cinematography and Film Editing. For the BAFTA Awards, the film won Best Special Visual Effects and Best Sound, along with a BAFTA nomination for Best Production Design. At the Saturn Awards, it won Best Science Fiction Film, Best Special Effects, Best Direction, Best Actress, and Best Performance by a Younger Actor, along with Saturn nominations for Best Actor, Best Supporting Actor, and Best Scenarist.

The film was nominated Best Cinematography by the A.S.C. Awards and won the People's Choice Favorite Motion Picture Award. The MTV Movie Awards honored the film with six awards including Best Action Sequence, Best Breakthrough Performance, Best Female Performance, Best Male Performance, Best Movie, and Most Desirable Female, along with MTV nominations for Best Song and Best Villain. Other recognitions includes a win for Best Dramatic Presentation by the Hugo Awards, Eddie Award nominated for Best Editing, and nominated for Outstanding Foreign Language Film by the Japanese Academy Awards.

The American Film Institute ranked the film at number 77 on the AFI's 100 Years...100 Thrills and ranked number 48 on AFI's 100 Years...100 Heroes and Villains. Schwarzenegger's famous quote "Hasta la vista, baby" was ranked at number 76 on the AFI's 100 Years...100 Movie Quotes best film quotes list. The film placed number 33 on Total Film's 2006 list of The Top 100 Films of All Time. In 2008, the film was voted the eighth best science fiction film ever on AFI's 10 Top 10. Empire ranked the film number 35 on its list of The 500 Greatest Movies of All Time.


Other sci-fi films of 1991: The comedy sci-fi Delicatessen (8.27 SFMZ final score) at the César Awards it won Best Editing, Best Film Work, Best Production Design and Best Writing. At the European Film Awards it won Best Set Design and at Fantasporto the Audience Jury Award. At the Guild of German Art House Cinemas Best Foreign Film and at Sitges Best Director, Best Original Soundtrack. At the Tokyo International Film Festival, it won the Gold Award.

Also released in '91 was Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country, earning a 7.19 SFMZ final score. The film was Oscar nominated for Best Sound Effects Editing and Best Make-Up. It won the Best Science Fiction Film Saturn Award along with Saturn nominations for Best Writing, Best Costumes, and Best Make-Up. There was also The Rocketeer, which won a Saturn award for Best Costumes along with Saturn nominations for Best Science Fiction Film, and Best Special Effects.





1992 - Batman Returns

6.6 / 6.6 7.0 X1 7.03

Batman Returns was generally well received by both reviewers and audiences. Rotten Tomatoes consenus: "Director Tim Burton's dark, brooding atmosphere, Michael Keaton's work as the tormented hero, and the flawless casting of Danny DeVito as The Penguin and Christopher Walken as, well, Christopher Walken, make the sequel better than the first." The New York Times thought that "Mr. Burton creates a wicked world of misfits, all of them rendered with the mixture of horror, sympathy and playfulness that has become this director's hallmark."

The Washington Post wrote: "Director Burton not only re-creates his one-of-a-kind atmosphere, he one-ups it, even two-ups it. He's best at evoking the psycho-murky worlds in which his characters reside." Variety wrote that "the real accomplishment of the film lies in the amazing physical realization of an imaginative universe." Entertainment Weekly wrote "No wonder some people felt burned by Batman Returns: Tim Burton just may have created the first blockbuster art film."

While receiving numerous nominations, the film won only two awards. The BMI Film Music Award and the Saturn Best Make-Up Award. It did receive two Oscar nominations, Best Visual Effects and Best Make-Up. Besides multiple nominations from Saturn, MTV Awards nominated it for Best Villain, Best Kiss, and Most Desirable Female. The film was Hugo nominated for Best Dramatic Presentation and BAFTA nominated for Best Special Effects. The American Film Institute nominated it for their 100 Years...100 Heroes and Villains list.


1992 was without almost any sci-fi films and if I hadn't of included superhero films for this feature, I would have combined this year with 1993. The only alternatives were Aien 3 and Timescape. Both films receiving less than impressive universal praise. Alien 3 did receive an Oscar nomination for Best Visual Effects and Timescape was Saturn nominated for Best Science Fiction Film.

Other recognition Alien 3 recieved includes Saturn nominations for Best Actress, Best Costumes, Best Director, Best Science Fiction Film, Best Supporting Actor, and Best Writing. The film received nominations from BAFTA Awards for Best Special Effects and a Hugo nomination for Best Dramatic Presentation. The MTV Movie Awards nominated the film for Best Action Sequence and it won the Motion Picture Sound Editors Award for Best Sound Editing.





1993 - Jurassic Park

8.2 / 7.2 68 8.0 X3 8.79

Jurassic Park won all three Academy Awards it was nominated for: Best Visual Effects, Best Sound Mixing, and Best Sound Editing. The film won honors outside of the U.S. including the 1994 BAFTA for Best Special Effects, as well as the Award for the Public's Favorite Film. It won the 1994 Hugo Award for Best Dramatic Presentation, and the 1993 Saturn Awards for Best Science Fiction Film, Best Direction, Best Writing, and Best Special Effects. The film won the 1993 People's Choice Awards for Favorite All-Around Motion Picture. Young Artist Awards were given to Ariana Richards and Joseph Mazzello, with the film winning an Outstanding Action/Adventure Family Motion Picture award.

The American Film Institute named Jurassic Park the 35th most thrilling film of all time on June 13, 2001. The Chicago Film Critics Association also ranked Jurassic Park as the 55th scariest movie of all time and, in 2005, Bravo chose the scene in which Lex and Tim are stalked by two raptors in the kitchen as the 95th scariest movie moment ever. On Empire magazine's fifteenth anniversary in 2004, it judged Jurassic Park the sixth most influential film of the magazine's lifetime.

Empire called the first encounter with a Brachiosaurus the 28th most magical moment in cinema. In 2008, an Empire poll of readers, filmmakers, and critics also rated it one of the 500 greatest films of all time. On Film Review's fifty-fifth anniversary in 2005, it declared the film to be one of the five most important in the magazine's lifetime. In 2006, IGN ranked Jurassic Park as the 19th greatest film franchise ever. In a 2010 poll, the readers of Entertainment Weekly rated it the greatest summer movie of the previous 20 years.


While 1993 saw the release of one of the best of the decade with Jurassic Park, sci-fi film at the box office was mainly lackluster. There was Demolition Man (6.24 SFMZ final score), which received very little praise from the critics community. The film did receive Saturn nominations for Best Science Fiction Film, Best Special Effects, and Best Costumes.

It also received a MTV Movie Award nomination for Best Villain. Sylvester Stallone wanted the Simon Phoenix character to be played by Jackie Chan. Chan refused, since Asian audiences don't like the idea of actors who have always played heroes suddenly playing evil characters.

The various critics reviews were even worse for Fire in the Sky, though it also received Saturn nominations for Best Science Fiction Film, Best Writing, and Best Music.





1994 - Stargate

5.3 / 6.6 6.9 X1 6.86

Stargate has garnered mostly mixed reviews. Out of Emmerich's 22 works, Stargate is currently his 3rd highest rated film. The positive reviews stated that it was an "instant camp classic", and praised the film for its special effects and entertainment value, with Chris Hicks of the Deseret News calling it "Star Wars meets Ben Hur".

The film received a warmer reception from the public, grossing $71.5 million at the US box office and $125 million in the rest of the world. At the time, the film set a record for the highest-grossing opening weekend for a film released in the month of October. In its first run, Stargate made more money than film industry insiders predicted, especially given its lukewarm reviews.

Some regard it as Emmerich's breakthrough film. Stargate grossed over $16,651,000 in the United States during its opening week in October 1994. It was the 35th highest-grossing film opening in the US in October. The film peaked at number one on the Billboard chart Top Video Rentals on April 29, 1995.

Stargate won a Saturn Award for Best Science Fiction Film, and Saturn nominated for Best Costumes & Best Special Effects. It also won Sci-Fi Universe Magazine's Best Science Fiction Film, Best Special Effects, and Best Supporting Actress Awards. The film was nominated for the Hugo Best Dramatic Presentation Award and the Fantasporto Best Film Award. The soundtrack won BMI's Film Music Award.


With the top film, Stargate, earning only a 6.86 SFMZ final score, 1994 was a lean year for sci-fi at the box office. Star Trek: Generations (6.59 SFMZ final score) won Sci-Fi Universe Magazine's Best Writing Award. The film was also Saturn nominated for Best Science Fiction Film and Hugo nominated for Best Dramatic Presentation.

Also released in '94, was Kenneth Branagh's Frankenstein, earning a 6.26 SFMZ final score. Winning zero awards anywhere, it did receive an Oscar nomination for Best Makeup. At the Saturn Awards, it received nominations for Best Actor, Best Actress, Best Horror Film, Best Make-Up, Best Music, Best Supporting Actor, and Best Writing. Other nominations include BAFTA Best Production Design, British Society of Cinematographer's Best Cinematography Award, Italian National Syndicate of Film Journalist's European Silver Ribbon, and Motion Picture Sound Editor's Golden Reel Award for Best Sound Editing.





1995 - 12 Monkeys

7.4 / 7.4 74 8.1 X3 8.19

12 Monkeys received a positive response from critics. Rotten Tomatoes consensus: "The plot's a bit of a jumble, but excellent performances and mind-blowing plot twists make 12 Monkeys a kooky, effective experience." Roger Ebert observed 12 Monkeys' depiction of the future, finding similarities with Blade Runner and Brazil. "The film is a celebration of madness and doom, with a hero who tries to prevail against the chaos of his condition, and is inadequate", Ebert wrote.

The Washington Post praised the art direction and set design. "Willis and Pitts's performances, Gilliam's atmospherics and an exhilarating momentum easily outweigh such trifling flaws in the script", Thomson reasoned. Rolling Stone magazine cited the film's success on Gilliam's direction and Willis' performance. Internet reviewer James Berardinelli believed the filmmakers took an intelligent and creative motive for the time travel subplot. Rather than being sent to change the past, James Cole is instead observing it to make a better future.

Brad Pitt was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor and Julie Weiss was Oscar nominated for Best Costumes. Pitt won a Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actora and Terry Gilliam won Best Director at the Berlin International Film Festival. 12 Monkeys was nominated for the Hugo Award for Best Dramatic Presentation and the Academy of Science Fiction, Fantasy & Horror Films awarded the film the Saturn Award for Best Science Fiction Film. Pitt and Weiss also won Saturn awards. Bruce Willis, Madeleine Stowe, Gilliam and writers David and Janet Peoples received nominations.


Other sci-fi films of 1995: Observers of Ghost in the Shell (7.92 SFMZ final score) praised its animation and computer animation and criticized it for its story and predictability. The film has made a positive impression on directors like Larry and Andy Wachowski and James Cameron.

The film won following awards: World Animation Celebration Best Director of Animation & Best Feature Film; Fantasporto Special Mention; Yokohama Film Festival Best Screenplay; Gérardmer Film Festival Special Mention; and was ranked 35 on Total Film's top 50 Animated Films list.

The French sci-fi fantasy The City of Lost Children earned a 7.96 SFMZ final score. The film won the César Best Production Design Award along with César nominations for Best Cinematography, Best Costume Design, and Best Music.

It also won the Motion Picture Sound Editor's Best Sound Editing Award. The film received a number of other nominations including: Saturn Awards Best Costumes, Best Horror Film, & Younger Actor Best Performance; Cannes Film Festival's Palme d'Or; Goya Award's Best Special Effects; Independent Spirit Award's Best Foreign Film; and Stockholm Film Festival's Bronze Horse Award.

There was also Strange Days (6.69 SFMZ final score) which won the Saturn Best Director and Best Actress Awards, along with Saturn nominations for Best Science Fiction Film, Best Writing, and Best Actor





1996 - Star Trek: First Contact

7.4 / 7.0 52 7.5 X3 7.73

First Contact garnered positive reviews on release. The Independent considered the film wise to dispense with the cast of The Original Series; "For the first time, a Star Trek movie actually looks like something more ambitious than an extended TV show." First Contact was more in the spirit of the 1960s television series than any previous installment.

The Globe and Mail said that First Contact succeeded in improving on the "stilted" previous entry in the series, and that it featured a renewed interest in storytelling. The Los Angeles Times wrote, "First Contact does everything you'd want a Star Trek film to do, and it does it with cheerfulness and style." The Age noted that the film was geared towards pleasing fans.

Variety wrote that the film did not require intimate knowledge of the series and that fans and non-fans alike would enjoy the film. Roger Ebert called First Contact one of the best Star Trek films, and James Berardinelli found the film the most entertaining Star Trek feature in a decade; "It has single-handedly revived the Star Trek movie series, at least from a creative point-of-view," he wrote.

First Contact earned an Academy Award-nomination for Best Makeup. At the Saturn Awards, the film was nominated in ten categories including Best Science Fiction Film, Best Actor for Patrick Stewart, and Best Director for Jonathan Frakes. It won three, for Best Costumes, Best Supporting Actor (Brent Spiner), and Best Supporting Actress (Alice Krige). Jerry Goldsmith won a BMI Film Music Award for his score, and the film was nominated for the Hugo Award for Best Dramatic Presentation.


Considered one of the top blockbusters in film history, Independence Day earned a 7.33 SFMZ final score. The film's trophy case is filled with numerous awards and nominations: Won Oscar for Best Visual Effects and Oscar nominated for Best Sound.

Three Saturn award wins - Best Special Effects, Best Science Fiction Film, Best Director, and eight Saturn nominations including Best Writer, Best Costumes, and Best Music. Hugo nominated for Best Dramatic Presentation. Won People's Choice Favorite Picture Award.

Won Grammy Best Instrumental Composition Award. Won two Satellite Awards for Outstanding Visual Effects and Film Editing. And a number of other awards and nominations from various other award organizations such as MTV and Blockbuster Entertainment Awards. The film also virtually swept all the award categories for the Sci-Fi Universe Magazine Awards.

Other sci-fi films of 1996 include: Tim Burton's Mars Attacks!, although it received numerous nominations, the only award it won worth noting is the Saturn Best Music Award. Other nomination highlights for Mars Attacks! include: Hugo Awards Best Dramatic Presentation; MTV Movie Awards Best Fight; Art Directors Guild Best Production Design / Feature Film; Chicago Film Critics Association Awards Most Promising Actress; Saturn Awards Best Costumes, Best Director, Best Science Fiction Film, Best Special Effects, Best Performance / Younger Actor, & Best Writer; and others.

Eraser won the following awards: BMI Film Music Award; Bambi Awards Best Film / International; and Golden Camera Awards Best International Actor. The film was also Oscar nominated for Best Sound Effects Editing and nominated for MTV's Best Action Sequence Award. The Arrival received only one nomination, the Catalonian International Film Festival Best Film Award.

Phenomenon won the following awards: BMI Film Music & Most Performed Song from a Film; Blockbuster Entertainment Awards Favorite Actor & Favorite Supporting Actor; and ASCAP Award Most Performed Songs from Motion Pictures.

The film recieved nominations from various award organizations including: Saturn Awards Best Fantasy Film; NCLR Bravo Award Outstanding Actor / Feature Film; Image Awards Outstanding Supporting Actor / Motion Picture; MTV Awards Best Kiss, Best Male Performance, & Best Movie Song; and Young Artist Awards Best Performance / Actress Age Ten or Under.





1997 - Gattaca

7.1 / 7.0 64 7.8 7.87

Gattaca has received positive reviews from critics; Roger Ebert stated, "This is one of the smartest and most provocative of science fiction films, a thriller with ideas." James Berardinelli praised it for "energy and tautness" and its "thought-provoking script and thematic richness."

Despite critical acclaim, Gattaca was not a box office success but it is said to have crystallized the debate over tampering with human genetics. The film's dystopian depiction of "genoism" has been cited by many bioethicists and laymen in support of their hesitancy about, or opposition to, liberal eugenics and the societal acceptance of the genetic-determinist ideology that may frame it. In a 1997 review of the film for the journal Nature Genetics, molecular biologist Lee M. Silver stated that "Gattaca is a film that all geneticists should see if for no other reason than to understand the perception of our trade held by so many of the public-at-large".

Gattaca was Oscar nominated for Best Art Direction and Art Directors Guild nominated for Award Excellence in Production Design. The film won the Bogey Award and two Gérardmer Film Festival Awards - Special Jury Prize and Fun Trophy. It was Golden Globe nominated for Best Original Score and Hugo nominated for Best Dramatic Presentation. Gattaca won the London Film Critics' Circle Awards for Best Screenwriter and received two awards from the Catalonian International Film Festival for Best Motion Picture and Best Original Soundtrack. The Paris Film Festival nominated the film for the Grand Award and Satellite Awards nominated for Best Art Direction and Production Design. The film was also Saturn nominated for Best Costume and Best Music.


Besides Gattaca, sci-fi fans were offered a wide selection of sci-fi film: The Visual Effects Society voted The Fifth Element (7.75 SFMZ final score) among the 50 most influential visual effects films of all time. The film was Oscar nominated and Golden Reel nominated for Best Sound Editing.

It won the BAFTA Award for Best Special Visual Effects, and the Prix Lumičre award for Best Director. It was nominated for seven César awards and won three for Best Director, Best Cinematography, and Best Production Design.

The Fifth Element was nominated for Film of the Year at the 1997 European Film Awards. It was also nominated for the Hugo Award for Best Dramatic Presentation, and for the Satellite Award for Best Visual Effects. The film was awarded the Technical Grand Prize at the 1997 Cannes Film Festival.

The film also received four Saturn Award nominations: Best Science Fiction Film, Best Costume, Best Special Effects, and Best Supporting Actress. It was nominated for the MTV Movie Award for Best Fight, and nominated for Best Actress – Newcomer at the Blockbuster Entertainment Awards.

Men in Black (7.70 SFMZ final score) won the Academy Award for Best Makeup, and was also nominated for Best Original Comedy Score and Best Art Direction. It was also nominated for the Golden Globe Award for Best Motion Picture - Musical or Comedy. The film received overwhelmingly positive reviews from critics, having a 91% rating on the Rotten Tomatoes film critic website.

On Empire magazine's list of the 500 Greatest Movies of All Time. The American Film Institute nominated it for it's All Time Lists - 100 Years...100 Laughs, 100 Heroes and Villains, 100 Songs, 100 Movie Quotes, and 10 Top 10 - Nominated Science Fiction Film.

Contact (7.22 SFMZ final score) won the Hugo Award for Best Dramatic Presentation and Jodie Foster won the Saturn Best Actress Award, along with a Golden Globe Best Actress nomination. Other Saturn nominations include Best Science Fiction Film, Best Director, Best Special Effects, Best Writer, and Best Music.

Contact also received an Oscar nomination for Best Sound. American Film Institute nominated the film for it's All Time Lists - 100 Years...100 Thrills and 10 Top 10 – Nominated Science Fiction Film.

Starship Troopers (6.77 SFMZ final score) was nominated for a number of awards, including the Academy Award for Visual Effects; the film won Saturn Awards for Best Costumes and Best Special Effects. Other films of '97 include Event Horizon, winning the Brussels International Festival's Pegasus Audience Award.

The Lost World: Jurassic Park, Oscar nominated for Best Visual Effects along with a few other nominations and wins from other award organizations such as The Saturn Awards and the Grammy Awards. Alien: Resurrection, receiving numerous nominations, but very little wins such as all nominations only from The Saturn Awards and The Satellite Awards.





1998 - The Truman Show

8.2 / 6.8 90 8.0 X2 8.24

The Truman Show received critical acclaim. Roger Ebert thought the film had a right balance of comedy and drama. The Los Angeles Times name it the best movie of 1998. In June 2010, Entertainment Weekly named Truman one of the 100 Greatest Characters of the Last 20 Years. James Berardinelli liked the film's approach of "not being the casual summer blockbuster with special effects." The Chicago Reader wrote, "Undeniably provocative and reasonably entertaining." The Film Threat said the film was not funny enough but still found "something rewarding in its quirky demeanor."

At the 71st Academy Awards, The Truman Show was nominated for three categories but did not win any awards. It received nominations for Best Director, Best Supporting Actor, and Best Original Screenplay. The Truman Show earned nominations at the Golden Globe Awards for Best Motion Picture, Best Director, and Screenplay. Jim Carrey and Ed Harris both won Golden Globes as Best Actor and Best Supporting Actor, respectively, as did Burkhard Dallwitz and Philip Glass for Best Original Score.

At the 52nd British Academy Film Awards, the film won awards for Direction, Original Screenplay and Production Design. In addition, the film was nominated for Best Film, Best Visual Effects, Best Supporting Actor, and Best Cinematography. The Truman Show was a success at The Saturn Awards, where it won the Best Fantasy Film and the Best Writing. Also, it was nominated for Best Actor, Best Supporting Actor and Direction at the Saturn Awards. Finally, the film won speculative fiction's Hugo Award for Best Dramatic Presentation.


Other sci-fi films of 1998 include Dark City (7.85 SFMZ final score), which won the Saturn Best Science Fiction Award (tied with Armageddon), along with Saturn nominations for Best Special Effects, Best Writer, Best Make-Up, Best Costume, and Best Director. The film was also Hugo nominated for Best Dramatic Presentation.

Darren Aronofsky's Pi received numerous wins and nominations including a win for the Sundance Film Festival's Directing Award along with a Sundance nomination for the Grand Jury Prize. At the Chlotrudis Awards, it won Best Cinematography and nominated for Best Director. At the Deauville Film Festival, it was nominated for the Grand Special Prize Award. The film was also nominated for Best Feature at the Gijón International Film Festival.

Pi won the Open Palm Award at the Gotham Awards. At the Independent Spirit Awards won Best First Screenplay along with nominations for Best Cinematography and Best First Feature. At the Málaga International Week of Fantastic Cinema, the film won Special Mention for the screenplay. The National Board of Review awarded it for Special Recognition for excellence in filmmaking. The Thessaloniki Film Festival award it the Golden Alexander.

The X Files was nominated for a number of Saturn Awards including Best Science Fiction Film and Best Director. Along with several wins and nominations from a number of award organizations, Armageddon received four Oscar nominations - Best Visual Effects, Best Music, Best Sound, and Best Sound Effects Editing. It also won the Saturn Awards Best Director Award along with Saturn nominations for Best Science Fiction Film, Best Actor, Best Costumes, Best Music, Best Special Effects, and best Best Supporting Actor





1999 - The Matrix

7.4 / 7.2 73 8.7 X4 8.61

The Matrix received positive reviews from most critics, and is widely regarded as one of the greatest science fiction films of all time. Entertainment Weekly called The Matrix "the most influential action movie of the generation". Rotten Tomatoes described it as an "ingenious" blend of Hong Kong action cinema, innovative visual effects and an imaginative vision. Philip Strick commented in Sight & Sound, "if the Wachowskis claim no originality of message, they are startling innovators of method," praising the film's details and its "broadside of astonishing images".

The Matrix received Academy Awards for film editing, sound effects editing, visual effects, and sound. The filmmakers were competing against other films with established franchises, like Star Wars Episode I: The Phantom Menace, yet they managed to sweep all four of their nominations. The Matrix also received BAFTA awards for Best Sound and Best Achievement in Special Visual Effects, in addition to nominations in the cinematography, production design and editing categories. In 1999, it won Saturn Awards for Best Science Fiction Film and Best Direction.

In 2001, The Matrix placed 66th in the American Film Institute's "100 Years...100 Thrills" list. In 2007, Entertainment Weekly called The Matrix the best science-fiction piece of media for the past 25 years. In 2009, the film was ranked 39th on Empire's reader-, actor- and critic-voted list of "The 500 Greatest Movies of All Time". The Matrix was voted as the fourth best sci-fi film in the 2011 list Best in Film: The Greatest Movies of Our Time, based on a poll conducted by ABC and People, and in 2012, the film was added to the National Film Registry for preservation.


1999 offered three sci-fi films with highly respectable universal praise: The Matrix, Being John Malkovich, and The Iron Giant. Spike Jonze's sci-fi fantasy Being John Malkovich (8.28 SFMZ final score), which could also easily be considered the best sci-fi film of '99 was Oscar nominated for Best Writing, Best Director, and Best Actress.

The film won two Saturn awards and one Saturn nomination. It also won BAFTA's Best Screenplay Award along with BAFTA nominations for Best Editing and Best Supporting Actress. The film received an additional 40 more nominations and wins from various award organization too numerous to list.

The Iron Giant (7.91 SFMZ final score) won BAFTA's Best Children's Film Award and Hugo nominated for Best Dramatic Presentation. The film received several wins and nominations from the Annie Awards, along with diverse recognition from other award organizations.

Highlights include winning Best Animation Award from the Florida Film Critics Circle, the Genesis Awards, Los Angeles Film Critics, the Las Vegas Film Critics, and the Santa Fe Film Critics Circle Animation. The film also won the Motion Picture Sound Editors Golden Reel Award for Best Sound Editing - Animated Feature, and nominated the Nebula Best Script Award.

Other films of '99 include Galaxy Quest, winner of the Hugo Best Dramatic Presentation Award along with a number of other wins and nominations from organizations including the Saturn Awards. Star Wars: Episode I - The Phantom Menace, which was Oscar nominated for Best Visual Effects, Best Sound, and Best Sound Effects Editing. The film also won Saturn awards for Best Special Effects and Best Costumes, along with several other wins and nominations in the award community.



SCI-FI BEST FILMS BY YEAR - 2000 to 2009 > > >




Resources: wikipedia.org, imdb.com, rottentomatoes.com, metacritic.com





Site design by SFMZone. Copyright 2010 All Rights Reserved. Viewing Requirements: 1280 resolution or above. | TOP^