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The Angry Red Planet (1959) Color
Starring Billy Curtis, Gerald Mohr, Jack Kruschen, Les Tremayne, Nora Hayden, Paul Hahn

Martians get mad--then get even! Light years ahead of its time, this slick sci-fi flick is "science-fantasy, monster-movie and romance all rolled into one" (Hollywood Citizen News).

With Martians like the leggy and very hairy "batratspidercrab," plus a rolling jello amoeba with rotating eyes, and flesh-eating plants, you'll think twice about jumping into a space ship--no matter where it's headed.

When an Earth rocket lands on Mars, the crew finds the planet more pink than red and not entirely dead. As these well-armed scientists begin to explore, they are attacked by unbelievable demented and horrific creatures at every turn.

Battling for their lives, the survivors make it back to their ship only to discover intelligent life--and a warning they'll never forget! In the film, the tiny, three-eyed Martian chartacter is played by actor Billy Curtis.



First Spaceship on Venus (1959) Color
Starring Yoko Tani, Aldrick Lukes

Based on "The Astronauts" by the great Stanislaw Lem (SOLARIS), this SF curio also boasts a multinational cast, as well as beautiful photography and production design. Though Lem disowned the film, it stands on its own rather well and is probably one of the best SF films from the fifties.

First Spaceship on Venus begins in 1985, when engineers involved in an industrial project to irrigate the Gobi Desert, accidentally unearth a mysterious and apparently artificial "spool". When found to be made of a material unknown on Earth, the spool is circumstantially linked to the Tunguska explosion of 1908.

The "spool" is seized on as evidence that the explosion, originally blamed on a meteor, was actually caused by a spaceship. Internationally renowned Professor Harringway pinpoints the alien craft's origin within Earth's own orbit - with Venus the only reasonably habitable world.

The spool itself is quickly discovered to be a flight recorder, and partially decoded by an international team of scientists led by Professor Sikarna and Dr. Tchen Yu.




References and Excerpts:
wikipedia.org, imdb.com








The World, the Flesh and the Devil (1959)

The World, the Flesh and the Devil is a science fiction doomsday film written and directed by Ranald MacDougall. The star is Harry Belafonte, who was then at the peak of his film career. The film is set in a post-apocalyptic world. It is based on two sources: the novel The Purple Cloud by M. P. Shiel and the story "End of the World" by Ferdinand Reyher.

African-American coal mine inspector Ralph Burton (Harry Belafonte) becomes trapped underground in a cave-in while inspecting a mine in Pennsylvania. He can hear rescuers digging towards him, but after a few days they slow down and then stop completely. Alarmed, he digs his own way out. Reaching the surface, he finds a deserted world. (No bodies are seen at any time in the film.)


Some discarded newspapers provide an explanation: one proclaims "UN Retaliates For Use Of Atomic Poison", another that "Millions Flee From Cities! End Of The World". Ralph later plays tapes at a radio station that an unknown nation had used radioactive isotopes as weapon, yielding a dust cloud that spread globally and was completely lethal for a five-day period.

Travelling to New York City in search of other survivors, he finds the city vacant. Ralph busies himself restoring power to a building where he takes up residence. Just as the loneliness starts to become intolerable, he encounters a second survivor: Sarah Crandall (Inger Stevens), a white woman in her twenties.


The two become fast friends, but Ralph grows distant when it becomes clear that Sarah is developing stronger feelings for him. Despite living in a post-apocalyptic world, he cannot overcome the inhibitions instilled in him in a racist American society. Ralph regularly broadcasts on the radio, hoping to contact other people. One day, he receives a signal from Europe.

Things become vastly more complicated when an ill, white Benson Thacker (Mel Ferrer) arrives by boat. Ralph and Sarah nurse him back to health, but once he recovers, Ben sets his sights on Sarah and sees Ralph as a rival. Ralph is torn by conflicting emotions. He avoids Sarah as much as possible, to give Ben every opportunity to win her affections, but cannot quite bring himself to leave the city.

Ben finally grows tired of the whole situation, realizing he stands little chance with Sarah as long as Ralph remains nearby. He warns Ralph that the next time he sees him, he will try to kill him. The two armed men hunt each other through the empty streets.


Finally, Ralph passes by the United Nations headquarters, climbs the steps in Ralph Bunche Park, and reads the inscription "They shall beat their swords into plowshares. And their spears into pruning hooks. Nation shall not lift up sword against nation. Neither shall they learn war any more", from the Book of Isaiah 2:4.

He throws down his rifle and goes unarmed to confront Ben, who in turn finds himself unable to shoot his foe. Defeated, he starts walking away. Sarah appears. When Ralph starts to turn away from her, she makes him take her hand; then she calls to Ben and gives him her other hand. Together, the three walk down the street to build a new future together. The film ends not with "The End" but with "The Beginning".





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Intro

1950

1951

1952

1953

1954

1955

1956

1957

1958

1959



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