AMZ Main

News, Reviews, & More

Visuals

Plot

Biographies

Interviews

Science of Avatar

3D Tech

Avatar Game



Mauro Fiore - image from cameraguild.com

FILMOGRAPHY

Cinematographer:

Avatar (2009)
Faceless (2006)
Tears of the Sun (2003)
Highway (2002)
The Center of the World (2001)
Billboard Dad (1998)
Love from Ground Zero (1998)
Breaking Up (1997)
An Occasional Hell (1996)
Soldier Boyz (1996)
Dominion (1995)
Drag (1993)
Automaton (1986)




Mauro Fiore - image from cinematographers.nl

Director of Photography:

The Kingdom (2007)
Smokin' Aces (2006)
The Call (2006)
The Island (2005)
Ticker (2002)
Training Day (2001)
Driven (2001)
Lost Souls (2000)
Get Carter (2000)
Tracey Takes On... (1997-1998)

Director of Photography / 2nd Unit:

Armageddon (1998)
Amistad (1997)
The Lost World: Jurassic Park (1997)
Trouble Bound (1993)
(& camera operator)




Mauro Fiore - image from cinematographers.nl

Camera and Electrical Department:

Jumbo Girl (2004)
(director of photography:
additional photography)
The Rock (1996)
(additional photographer)
Tall Tale (1995)
(chief lighting technician)
Mi vida loca (1993)
(camera operator: "b" camera)
The Adventures of Huck Finn (1993)
(camera operator)

Gaffer:

Distance (2003)
Schindler's List (1993)
One False Move (1992)
(second unit)
Poison Ivy (1992)
(additional photography)
Wildflower (1991)
Pyrates (1991)

Key Grip :

Far from Home (1989)
Stripped to Kill II: Live Girls (1989)


Trivia

Member of the American Society
of Cinematographers (ASC).

Columbia College classmate of Janusz Kaminski, Director of Photography for Indiana Jones 4, Saving Private Ryan, and Steven Spielberg's upcoming sci-fi film Interstellar.


Awards

2003 DVD Premiere Awards
Best Cinematography Nomination
for Highway (2002).





BIOGRAPHIES - MAURO FIORE



Mauro Fiore

Mauro Fiore, A.S.C. | Avatar Cinematographer
Sources: IMDB.com, cameraguild.com,
screenmag.tv, cinematographers.nl


Born in Marzi, Calabria, Italy, Mauro Fiore's family moved to the USA in 1971 where he obtained his education at the Columbia College, Chicago.

Career: 'Fiore and Janusz Kaminski began their association with a simple phone call. Following film school, Kaminski had relocated to California to attend the American Film Institute and - as fate would have it - began working as a gaffer for B-movie producer Roger Corman.

At the time, Fiore had been trekking around Europe and was searching for a foothold into the film industry. He quickly sped out to Hollywood to join Kaminski as his roommate and key grip on Corman productions.

As Kaminski ascended to his position as Steven Spielberg's director of photography, Fiore proceeded to assist him as gaffer and second-unit cinematographer. "Obviously, Janusz could have selected any cinematographer in the world to shoot his directing debut ['Lost Souls']," says Fiore.

"The main reason he chose me was because we have a professional and personal relationship which goes back 15 years. When you know someone that long, there's a shorthand that exists. It's a rapid communication that frees people up to take chances and do their very best work."' [From article by David Geffner.]



Mauro Fiore, ASC helps James Cameron envision Avatar, a 3D sci-fi adventure
that combines hi-definition video and motion capture
By Jay Holben | American Cinematographer January 2010 Magazine
Excerpt transcribed by AMZ


January 29, 2009 - For Avatar's live-action work, James Cameron teamed with Mauro Fiore ASC. "Jim saw Tears of the Sun and The Island, and he was apparently impressed with the way I'd treated the jungle and foliage scenes in both films," say Mauro. "They brought me in for a three hour interview, and Producer Jon Landau walked me through the whole 3D process, the motion capture images, the promos and trailers they had done.

The next day, I had a 30-minute interview with Jim, and we hit it off. They were already deep into production on the motion capture stages in Playa del Rey, California and they were preparing the live action footage in New Zealand.

The technology employed on Avatar enable Cameron to design the film's 3D computer generated environments (created by Lightstorm's in-house design team) straight from his imagination. By the time Fiore joined the project, the director had been working for 18 months on motion capture stages, shooting performances with actors who would be transformed into entirely CG characters. Glen Derry, Avatar's virtual production supervisor, contributed a number of innovations that helped Cameron achieve what he wanted.

With all of the locations pre-built in Autodesk MotionBuilder and all of the CG characters constructed, Derry devised a system that would composite the motion-capture information into the CG world in real time. He explains, "With motion capture work, the director usually completes elaborate previs shots and sequences, shoots the actors on the motion capture stage, and then sends the footage off to post.

Then, visual effects artists composite the CG characters into the motion capture information, execute virtual camera moves and send the footage back to the director. But that approach just wasn't going to work for Jim. He wanted to be able to interact in real time with the CG characters on the set, as though they were living beings. He wanted to be able to handhold the camera in his style and get real coverage in the CG world.



Personal Quotes

On filming The Island: "It was a bit overwhelming when we first walked onto those sets, but we started slowly, breaking things apart and trying things out. The sets were definitely huge, but I had to concentrate on what is going to come through the lens. When you think about it that way, itís not so overwhelming. In a way, thatís what we do for a living. Once weíre shooting, I donít ever feel the size of the production. I feel like my friends and I are making a film. Whatever the size and budget of a project, it always feels like an intimate experience for me.

Of course there are sequences that required careful planning and detailed storyboards. But we made a point of following our instincts and diverting from the plan if an opportunity presented itself. We might be in downtown Detroit, ready to shoot in one direction, when we see some interesting neon in another direction. We were light enough on our feet to adjust the shot and include it. Itís important on a project like this to remember that all the technical aspects are there to serve the artistic side.

Itís fun and interesting to compose images for the widescreen aspect ratio. It provides lots of different possibilities for enhancing the storytelling. This was more of a horizontal film than a vertical one, partly because some of the environments were laid out more horizontally. Another great thing about anamorphic framing is the ability to include elements in the background. You can be in a close-up on a face and there is space on the sides of the frame to play with compositionally and dramatically.

There was one scene in the Foundation Room that included about 80 tables laid out in a dark laboratory and a bunch of suspended bodies. When you see it, the way itís lit, the bodies almost look like sculptures. We wanted to be able to see specifically the grid above these tables and bodies, and the sharpness of the anamorphic format really helped us there.

What I like about that stock is the contrast. I tried to use it as much as I could. The speed allows me to utilize a polarizing filter outside and not have a problem with the stop. It also means I can go through the whole day with one film stock, rather than having to switch at the end of the day as the light fades."


On filming Smokin' Aces: "It's a lot like going over to your best friend's house for a party every day. Joe's dedicating songs to you in-between takes, and he lets everyone pack into the trailer at the end of the day to watch dailies. I liken it to my family's big Italian dinners. There's always five conversations going at once and everyone has an opinion about everything. It's crazy, but it's invigorating.

What made it such an efficient show, is the degree to which our prep time was used on the set. Joe and I would discuss scene blocking, camera placement, framing, and lens selection while we scouted each location. We'd spend hours on our tech scouts discussing the conceptual meaning behind each scene, so that when the day came there wasn't a need for long conversations.

At one point we were going to take the ceiling off the set and use a Technocrane. But I was adamant about working within the set because it's disruptive to the audience to suddenly have the roof disappear. Our production designer, Martin Whist, built a portion of the hallway to see how much width we would need to follow them in one direction on a dolly.

Our gaffer, Mike Bauman, was able to boost the overall ambience using mostly soft instruments from above. It was important for the light on the walls to drop off and pool in the center, to keep with the look we had established for the Tremor brothers. Martin built removable ceiling panels so we could tuck more lights up in the rafters.

Instead of fighting the genre style we've seen on all the TV shows about FBI agents, I embraced the look, using long lenses and floating with the dolly when they are observing crime scenes. Taraji and Alicia Keys were basically straight out of black exploitation films."



All of the news highlights on this page are excerpts, click on the source link for the complete article.



AMZ Main

News, Reviews, & More

Visuals

Plot

Biographies

Interviews

Science of Avatar

3D Tech

Avatar Game



Site design by SFMZone. Copyright 2010 All Rights Reserved. Viewing Requirements: 1280 resolution or above. | TOP^